Sunday, January 6, 2013

ESTIMATION STUDY OF FATAL CRASH RATES FOR SUSPENDED/REVOKED AND UNLICENSED DRIVERS IN CALIFORNIA STUDY BY DMV

ESTIMATION BY DMV OF FATAL CRASH RATES FOR SUSPENDED/REVOKED AND UNLICENSED DRIVERS IN CALIFORNIA

According to the DMV, this study's results provide strong evidence that suspended/revoke and unlicensed drivers are much more hazardous on the road than are validly licensed drivers, California DUI attorneys report.

Compared to licensed drivers, those who drive without a valid license are nearly 3 times more likely to cause a fatal crash relative to their exposure, according to the DMV information found by California DUI lawyers.


If convicted of driving on a suspended license in California per Vehicle Code Section 14601 et.seq., penalties include vehicle impound, over $1,000 in fines., jail time, suspension of license and probation, lawyers warn.


This California DMV study's findings strongly justify the use of countermeasures, including vehicle impoundment, to control suspended/revoked and unlicensed drivers and to reduce crashes caused by these drivers, San Diego DUI lawyers are told.

Please note this report is issued as a publication of the Department of Motor Vehicles Research and Development Branch rather than an official report of the State of California.

In a nutshell, this California DMV study used a quasi-induced exposure (QIE) analysis technique to estimate annual fatal crash involvement rates for suspended/revoked, unlicensed, and validly licensed drivers in California from 1987 through 2009 using fatal crash data obtained from National Highway Traffic Safety Administration’s Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) and California Department of Highway Patrol’s Statewide Integrated Traffic Records System (SWITRS). The annual fatal crash involvement ratios range from 0.81 to 0.91 for validly licensed drivers, 1.44 to 4.29 for S/R drivers, and 1.60 to 3.50 for unlicensed drivers, respectively, over the 23-year time period studied. The annual at-fault overinvolvement rates for suspended/revoked and unlicensed drivers relative to validly licensed drivers range from 1.57 to 4.93 for the suspended/revoked group and from 1.84 to 4.10 for the unlicensed group. Although the annual rates fluctuate, suspended/revoked and unlicensed drivers were overinvolved as at-fault drivers in fatal crashes every year relative to validly licensed drivers. The fatal crash involvement ratios obtained for all years combined (1987 through 2009) are 0.86 for validly licensed drivers, 2.23 for S/R drivers, and 2.34 for unlicensed drivers. The at-fault overinvolvement rates for the suspended/revoked and unlicensed groups, relative to the validly licensed group, are 2.60 and 2.73, respectively, for this 23-year period.

California DMV / DUI references include:

An in-depth literature review of studies on the use of vehicle impoundment found that this countermeasure and other vehicle-based sanctions yielded substantial traffic safety benefits when applied in various jurisdictions to drivers caught driving without a valid license.

Voas, R. B., & DeYoung, D. J. (2002). Vehicle action: Effective policy for controlling (DUI) drunk and other high-risk drivers? Accident Analysis and Prevention, 34(3), 263-270.

California license suspension/revocation has been used for decades to control problem drivers. California departmental studies have consistently found that withdrawal of the driving privilege reduces subsequent traffic violations and crashes among treated drivers. This safety outcome is achieved even though most suspended/revoked drivers continue to drive during the period of suspension or revocation (U.S. Department of Transportation, 2008).

The reason is that, even though the license suspension/revocation order is being violated, suspended/revoked drivers limit their exposure and drive more carefully to avoid detection (Clark & Bobevski, 2008; Hagen, McConnell, & Williams, 1980; Ross, H. L., & Gonzales, P. (1988). Effects of license revocation on (DUI) drunk driving offenders. Accident Analysis and Prevention. 20(5), 379-391.)





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