Sunday, April 7, 2013

One of the highest growing reasons for a California DUI police officer to stop a driver on a California road is when the driver is texting or on his or her cell phone, attorneys notice as San Diego cracks down April 3 to 16, 2013

One of the highest growing reasons for a California DUI police officer to stop a driver on a California road is when the driver is texting or on his or her cell phone, attorneys notice.

Being on your cell phone unfortunately distracts your driving.  It may cause you to weave or swerve, California DUI lawyers remind.  And the consequence could be a California drunk driving conviction and $10,000 to $15,000 in costs.

The San Diego County DUI Law Center suggests that people put their phones away prior to driving. Turn them off. Put them in the trunk or glove box, California criminal defense lawyers recommend.

If the police have no lawful reason to stop you, a California DUI attorney can file this DUI lawyer motion to suppress evidence, which if granted can lead to a dismissal.

San Diego Sheriff's (DUI and regular) Deputies are presently on high alert and will be for a good part of April 2013, specifically searching for California drivers using their cell phones to text or talk without a headset. Deputies will work with CHP Officers to conduct zero tolerance enforcements from  April 3rd to April 16th.


April 2013 is the 3rd annual "National Distracted Driving Awareness” month. The fine for a first offense
of texting or using a hand‐held cell phone while driving in California is $159 plus court fees, with subsequent violations being much higher.

Distracted driving causes other drivers on California roads to be at risk.

California drivers utilizing hand‐held devices while driving are 4 times more probable to have an accident and to injure themselves.  Mix it with alcohol and a California DUI may be waiting to happen.

Texting while driving can delay a driver’s reaction time just as severely as having a blood alcohol content of a legally drunk driver (BAC of a California DUI driver.)

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) says there is no difference in the risks between hands-free and hand‐held cell phone conversations, both of which can result in “inattention blindness” which occurs when the brain isn’t seeing what is clearly visible because the driver's focus is on the phone conversation and not on the road.

Focus on the task of driving while driving a vehicle.

"One Text or Call Could Wreck It All." “It’s Not Worth It!”

To view a public safety message on distracted driving, visit this site, California DUI attorneys are told.